America’s geography of wealth: the shrinking urban middle class 

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Source: America’s geography of wealth: the shrinking urban middle class visualised | Cities | The Guardian

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‘Send Me A Friend’

Local (well, by way of Sweden but well over  25+ years ago) blues legend Anders Osborne has experienced the lows of addiction and the difficulty in being a working musician when that addiction is under control too. His program is a great idea for others struggling to stay sober while working in bars and clubs. He is a great musician and clearly, a great friend to other musicians at home and abroad.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/22/525060029/send-me-a-friend-anders-osborne-helps-musicians-stay-sober-on-tour?

 

Check out his music and bio here

 

 

Tanya & Dorise

After playing 15 years on the street, we’ve decided to end our run. Thank you for the love and memories!

Please keep us in our hearts as we embark on our next chapter. For any questions or comments, please contact us directly:
Dorise can be reached at Doriseblackmon@gmail.com

Tanya can be found at tanyahuang.com

We are no longer accepting bookings. Music is still available for purchase below.

Sorry for any inconvenience.

WE LOVE YOU!!

The ‘You Get Paid, I Get Paid’ campaign

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“This cause is personal to me because my family has been taunted by photographers about how much they have sold my daddy’s image for, and they even tried to take photos at his funeral without permission,” states Cherice Harrison-Nelson, curator of the Hall of Fame, big queen of Guardians of the Flame Maroon Society, and the daughter of legendary Big Chief Donald Harrison. “But this is bigger than my family – the green paper provides evidence of how widespread this disregard for the artistic skill of Mardi Gras Indians has become. We will use it to further advance the ‘You Get Paid, I Get Paid’ campaign we launched during last year’s Blue Linen Night.”

The green paper was completed as part of a broad coalition that is advocating for greater equity in New Orleans cultural economy and tourism industry. Organized during Foundation for Louisiana’s 2014 Equity Caucus and funded by the foundation’s TOGETHER Initiative, this working group is developing a survey, app and other tools to help culture bearers gain more control over the economic aspects of their work.

http://www.foundationforlouisiana.org/news/18/mardi-gras-indian-hall-of-fame-releases-quot-green-paper-quot-revealing-impact-of-image-exploitation-on-local-culture-bearers

Jackson Square artists could leave after losing supply cart storage space

As far as I am concerned, the city needs to maintain a storage space for square artists. It is important to note that this is not retail space that is used for these carts, but a corridor under the steps. Granted, it looks like crap, but so do many public spaces that the city controls and does not maintain.

The move comes in advance of a construction project aimed at “revitalizing” Washington Artillery Battery park and the Moonwalk.

Jackson Square artists could leave after losing supply cart storage space | NOLA.com

 

http://photos.nola.com/4500/gallery/french_quarter_artist_to_clear/index.html#/1

Keeping Your Artists Close to Home 

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Article is by Katy Reckdahl, a great local writer.

Policymakers have debated how best to support the city’s culture in a time of rising rents and stagnant wages. If done correctly, artist housing slated to open next year in the former Andrew J. Bell Junior High School in the Treme neighborhood could provide an important model for cities looking to preserve and support traditional culture through affordable housing.

“We have the opportunity to show how vibrant arts are essential to our humanity in New Orleans,” said Stephanie McKee, the artistic director of Junebug Productions, a nonprofit that will be based in one of Bell’s community spaces.

 

In late 2005, not long after Katrina, musicians Harry Connick Jr. and Branford Marsalis asked Habitat to establish several dozen houses that musicians could qualify for through sweat equity along with a 20-year, interest-free loan.

But, early on, Habitat found fewer musicians qualified than it had hoped. It hadn’t predicted the level of bad credit and outstanding debt or the general lack of documentation. So Habitat reworked its process, using specially earmarked money from donors to help some musicians pay off small outstanding debts and working with many others to find alternative ways of proving income for the Habitat-underwritten loans.

“Normally, we get tax returns and wage statements,” says Marguerite Oestricher, Habitat’s chief advancement officer. “But with the Musicians’ Village, we had to get pretty creative. Because many musicians live in a cash economy, we’d ask them, ‘Where are you working?’ and we’d take a note from a club owner, saying that so-and-so plays here two days a week.”

Though it took some heavy lifting to create, the Village is now bustling with musicians. The delinquency rate on loans there has been very low, Oestricher said.

 

 

Learning from their artist-housing predecessors, Butler and McKee are going to start convening meetings for potential tenants by early 2017, even though the property won’t start taking applications until the fall, to encourage them to get their paperwork in order.

“We know that there are certain documents that they have to have to apply,” she said. “So we will ask, ‘Can we connect you with someone who can help you get your taxes done?’ Or ‘Even if you don’t have a bank account, can you get a letter from your employer to confirm your income?’”

“We want to get on top of this before this process even begins,” she said. “We’ve got to just keep pounding away at it. There will be no other opportunity like this.”

Keeping Your Artists Close to Home – Shelterforce – National Housing Institute

Save Buskers Bunkhouse by Pearl Heart – GoFundMe

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 Buskers Bunkhouse in New Orleans, formerly known as Kamp Katrina, is being reincarnated as a nonprofit in Bywater…The house needs repairs. Ms Pearl’s concern is that she may not be able to meet with the demands for these repairs in time as she is on a fixed income. Fines can reach up to 500 dollars a day for each offense.

Source: Save Buskers Bunkhouse by Pearl Heart – GoFundMe

Inside the impossible life of a New York street vendor

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New York tells itself a story. It goes like this. We are sharp-elbowed bastards who live in filth, surrounded by sewer rats, but with enough chutzpah, drive and determination, any of us can rise high enough to scrape the sky. It’s a myth, of course, and like all myths, it contains a narrow shard of truth. But with each year that shard shrinks, under the weight of gentrification, corporations and police.

Source: Inside the impossible life of a New York street vendor | US news | The Guardian

Love has passed

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Angie Bradford facebook post:

Really sad to hear about the passing of Dr. Love. He brought so much laughter and adventure into our lives. He was a legend around the city but especially at Jackson Square. I can never think of the Square without thinking of him. We wouldn’t see him for a little bit, but when he’d come back, he always had some tall story to tell about where he’d just come from. One of my favorite memories of him was when John Michael was a little boy…Me, John Michael, Dr. Love and Tuba went walking through the Bywater. Tuba had on a pair of plastic boobs and Dr. Love had his necklace of keys on and was carrying his golf club swinging it every now and then as he explained how he’d just come back from teaching golf at a club for boys. We laughed so much that day that my stomach hurt. You can only imagine the looks we got with Tuba wearing those fake boobs over his clothes. And the words back and forth between John Michael, Tuba, and Dr. Love just made for a comedy. You will be missed Dr. Love…Your name was a fit for you because you really did bring Love and laughter wherever you went.